Hire the best Home Extension Experts

Studs at the sides of openings - beam perpendicular to wall

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Novice
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    20

    Default Studs at the sides of openings - beam perpendicular to wall

    I need to install a beam to span out an opening. The engineer has sized the beam as a 295x65 GL17C.

    The beam will be supported at one end by a nib wall (straight forward), but at the other end will be supported by a stud wall that is perpendicular to the beam. The engineer has called up 4/90x35 MGP12 studs at either side of the opening.

    My question is how to I fit 4 studs under the beam where it connects to the wall perpendicular to the beam?

    There is a floor bearer directly below and parallel with the beam which will support the studs. It is 75mm wide.

    Hope this all makes sense.

  2. #2
    1K Club Member Pulse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Port Macquarie
    Posts
    1,752

    Default Studs at the sides of openings - beam perpendicular to wall

    I would think the 4 studs sit under the top plate all nail laminated together the beam sits on the top plate centred over the 4 studs.


    ====

  3. #3
    Novice
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Thanks Pulse,

    So essentially the beam is only sitting on the 2 centre studs? The ones on the outside won't take any load directly but I guess will stiffen the centre ones?

    This was my first thought, but the 2 extra studs seem a bit superfluous. Essentially the 4 nail laminated studs will be bending about their minor axis (the major axis of the individual stud, but minor of the laminated group), which doesn't seem like the intent to me, but if this is common building practice I am more than happy.

    Clarification/Questions:
    - The beam is actually a lintel so will sit below the top plate
    - The beam needs to sit at the end of the perpendicular wall as it form a corner - do you think this changes anything?
    - The stud wall will be built parallel to the floor joists but ontop of the existing timber floor. I intend to put blocking between the joists to transfer to load from the wall directly to the bearer.
    - What is the best way to tie-down the beam?

    Cheers

  4. #4
    Novice
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Was just heaving a look through AS1684.4, and saw Clause 6.3.2.3:

    (c) 4 members (e.g., 4/90 45)—provide 2 full-length studs plus 2 secondary jamb studs

    So I guess only 2 studs need to go below the beam. The other 2 go full height to the top plate.

  5. #5
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    16,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stevos View Post

    So I guess only 2 studs need to go below the beam. The other 2 go full height to the top plate.
    How I did mine, but pretty much nail laminated 5 studs together.
    That's a hefty beam, must be a very large opening, so are 4 studs enough!
    My opening is 5.5m and I used a GLC 240x115. It deflected less than expected and ended up virtually straight. I used the Smartframe software to determine the size.
    Amazing how timber can stretch.

  6. #6
    1K Club Member Pulse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Port Macquarie
    Posts
    1,752

    Default Studs at the sides of openings - beam perpendicular to wall

    that sounds right 2 outer stud ms to top plate. I would think strap both full length studs over top plate but best check the AS and the certifier


    ====

  7. #7
    Community Moderator phild01's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, north
    Posts
    16,620

    Default

    I remember reading somewhere that the number of studs needs to be calculated and it seemed to work out to be equivalent to half the studs that the opening would normally have if it was built as a wall.

  8. #8
    Novice
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    20

    Default

    Thanks guys.

    Engineer has specified the beam size and number of studs so no questions on its size. He is very conservative.

    The beam essentially carries roof loads from a change in pitch of the roof

    Unfortunately the engineer isn't so forthcoming with construction details...

  9. #9
    4K Club Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    6,507

    Default

    If the engineer is a conservative I wonder why 90*35 was spec'd and not 90*45 and hardwood. I say that because trimming the 35mm to fit the 65mm of the beam leaves a very thin bit of timber than isn't going to do much but cutting 32.5mm from a 45 leaves a decent half inch. Personally I would be going 4 off 90*45s if it was my build as I am very conservative where these things are concerned. Something similar in our kitchen renovation but sitting on the top plate, a 4 metre span and 3 studs in total, one on the side of an existing double corner stud A little extra is a damned good thing
    "A big boy did it and ran away"

    Legal disclaimer denying responsibility to be inserted here.

Similar Threads

  1. Niche into shower wall on studs
    By dastrix in forum Bathrooms
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 28th Dec 2017, 12:26 PM
  2. How many studs are required for my load bearing beam
    By Lemmiwinks in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 13th Sep 2013, 02:41 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13th Dec 2012, 07:45 PM
  4. Wall studs
    By sinjin in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 29th Sep 2008, 08:42 PM
  5. Wall studs
    By chrissyoscar in forum Structural Renovation
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 25th Jul 2006, 10:03 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •