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Internal Trims and Skirting

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  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member)
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    Default Internal Trims and Skirting

    G'Day everyone. I'm new and have no clues about wood, please help.
    We've recently purchased a home with heaps of internal brown wood. It looks like it's been painted or stained. I would like to restore/revive the wood trim as it's currently looking rather sad and dull. Please advise how I can best do this. I've attached some photos to give you an idea. Any advise would be welcomed.Thanks in advance.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails clip_image002.jpg   clip_image003.jpg  

  2. #2
    2K Club Member seriph1's Avatar
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    Kilmore, near Melbourne, Australia
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    Default

    Hi and welcome to the forum - the area of interior timber restoration is quite specialised and can be fraught with disaster. From the pictures, your home looks like a Late Edwardian/Early Cal. Bungalow - seeing the exterior would tell me the precise date and region.

    Anyway, you clearly wish to return your trims to the highest level of finish, which I applaud - importantly, your trim will have had years of various finishes applied to it and it is vital to establish what needs to be done.

    Here is how the process works (according to me anyway)

    1. Identify the timber
    2. Identify the finish
    3. Select the correct product/s to remove the oxidised/inappropriate finish
    4. Neutralise the chemicals in the products used
    5. Wait long enough for the material to dry and re acclimatise to the home
    6. Refinish and fall back in love with your home



    It seems a very lengthy process but it's worth it and doesn't really take that long.

    The range of products on the market today, is staggering. the people who are expert in these tasks are few. The best person to do it is you, IF you have the time and energy/commitment.

    there are many mechanical devices that can help make it a lot easier and even though they may cost a few bucks, at the end of it all, you still have them to use on other projects.

    You may have picked up that I love period homes... I have advised on, or performed a few hundred restorations and would be pleased to assist if you need some guidance

    Best of luck with it and don't forget to let other members know how you get on - it really helps. Once you become expert (and before!) you can help others to "get the details right"

    BTW it helps to list your suburb and age details in the sidebar as it helps members know better how to help, especially when deciding whether to speak in metric or inches, or send you to Wangaratta or Williamstown for stuff

    Above all, have fun!

    Steve
    Kilmore (Melbourne-ish)
    Australia

    ....catchy phrase here

  3. #3
    Apprentice (new member)
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    Default

    Steve, thank you for your reply. I took some photos this morning, there's one in there of the skirting and the front door. The door has cracks all over it do you think I can save it?
    Getting back to your reply. I hope steps 3 and 4 will not require a lot of chemicals. I have a young baby and had hoped to do all this once we moved in, would this be ok or is it best to delay moving in until we have completed the reno?
    I intend to have a professional fix the plaster (the house was restumped 30 years ago and someone has tried to fix the plaster and they didn't do a good job) then I'll have a go at reviving the trims.
    **sigh**I can see the potential but the process seems quite daunting...rambling..look forward to your replies.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  4. #4
    2K Club Member seriph1's Avatar
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    Hi again

    The finish could be anything, but I am yet to find a product that can't be repaired or refinished .... just takes time/focus/energy/money and commitment



    the all time worst product was Estapol Antique - that stuff will survive nuclear winter I reckon. Nearly impossible to remove, but it can be done. Your place doesn't have it I don't think.

    Obviously chemicals and rapidly dividing genes (babies especially) need special attention. These days, almost all of the products available are safe to use, provided the instructions are followed. Heaps of ventilation and bubby going out for the day is the best thing I reckon.

    Many of today's strippers are citrus-based and far less volatile than their counterparts.

    The door sounds like it is "crazed" and actually might be a good thing - the finish is likely to be a natural varnish that may well be able to be repaired without too much fuss.

    The best thing to do is get each surface finish identified (as far as is possible). Then create a schedule for doing the work in manageable chunks, because there is nothing that eats away at domestic facility more than having a job 80% finished for weeks longer than estimated, so really think about how long stuff will take .... start with the smallest job you can, to see what you will be up against.

    Finally, yours is a substantial home, renovated and extended sympathetically, it seems. If you're interested to know more about Bungalows, there are several excellent books and a brilliant magazine dedicated to the subject. They are all American and concerned with that country's bungalows. Californian Bungalows are (in large part) mere shadows of their US parents, but it is definitely possible to renovate and decorate one of these to be closer to how they were meant to be.

    Steve
    Kilmore (Melbourne-ish)
    Australia

    ....catchy phrase here


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