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Cutting Fibreboard

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  1. #1
    Apprentice (new member)
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    Post Cutting Fibreboard

    I,ve got to cut some Villa board to line some bathroom walls prior to tileing. I was wondering what's the best way to cut it. Is it feasable to cut it with a powersaw with a special blade or is it best to cut with a "fibro" cutter.

    A guy at one of the local hardware/tool outlet suggested a special saw blade/cutting disc. I have a guide system for my power saw and could cut it to size very accuratley.

    I can connect the saw up to a dust extraction system to eliminate some of the dust.

    Any suggestions?

    Peter

  2. #2
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    Post

    The cheapest and cleanest method is with a tungsten carbide tipped knife (score and snap). Good if you only have a few cuts. I have used this method effectively.
    Next time I think I would hire some fibre cement shears for a day.
    I tried an angle grinder with diamond blade but the dust was horrendous. If you have good dust extraction you could try using a saw but the dust is very fine.
    George

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Post

    In my opinion DON'T use a power tool to do the job unless you do it outside and even then with a mask. Even then I would'nt do it either as you may pose a risk to your neigbours.
    I did over 100 square meters of tiling and I cut it all using a tugsten tiped scraping tool.
    If it is manufactured by a reptiable company you will find warnings on the cement sheet for reasons mentioned above as it is carsenogenic. (yes I know I can't spell but you all still like me, right!)
    After all you don't want a lung transplant in 20 years.

    Hope I had an influence.

    regards

    Gino

  4. #4
    Senior Member Eastie's Avatar
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    Post

    Steer clear of grinders and power saws. Go with either nibbler/sheers or a scraping tool and a straight edge as Gino said.

    There are a few little 6" diamond blade tile circ saws out there that have a water feed line (either tap or gravit feed out of a bucket) but I'd opt to steer clear - they don't look too water resistant to me.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Eastie's Avatar
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    Post

    PS you should be able to hire sheers

  6. #6
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    Post

    I have done fair a bit of work with villaboard and Harditex, the 3 methods described work ok but as mentioned using power tools does a tremendous amount of dust and even when you are done cutting it is everywhere, the very fine dust is a pain to sweep of your pavers, the plants are suddenly white, swmbo complains etc..
    My preferred method is the fibro cutter, it is reasonably accurate but the edges are not as nice as with a diamond tipped blade, anyway Villaboard is either joined or tiled over so the edges are not really important and a high precision is generally not necessary.
    Just put 2 pieces of 50x50 under your sheet and cut it on the ground.

    I'd lend you my cutters but I guess Sydney is a bit far for you they cost around $50 and many small hardware shops rent them.

    PS: Donít forget to prime your villaboard before tiling, makes it much easier to tile.

    Hope that helps

    Jack


  7. #7
    Senior Member soundman's Avatar
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    Post

    I'd have to agree with the above.
    Long straight cuts the full width or length.... Score & snap.
    Fiddly bits.... fibro cutter

    Abrasive wheel is great if you want to star in a horror movie as the carpenter of the undead after.
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.

  8. #8
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    Unhappy

    Thanks everyone for the advice. I'll inverst in a set of fibro shears. I borrowed a old set off a mate but they tended to pull a bit to one side when they cut. Is this normal?

    I have seen what a healthy lung looks like compared to a cancerous one and it dosent look too good. It definatly encourages me to wear a mask, in fact I went out and bought a good one.

    Got another question. I have to remove some old architraves that are plaster on a plaster ceiling. Is there an easy way to do this? I'm worried about damaging the plaster on the cieling and having to replaster it.

    Thanks again for you advice - Peter

  9. #9
    Senior Member soundman's Avatar
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    Post

    Mine pull a little to one side but they can be easily held straight, I think its because there is a slight angle on the cutting blade.
    If they are old they may be realy blunt so they wont bite and stay on the line.


    As far as flush cutting archatrave. the only too I know of is the fein sander device with a special blade attached.
    I have been told they are nearly magical. I have one but never used that function.
    Any thing with sharp teeth eats meat.
    Most powertools have sharp teeth.
    People are made of meat.

  10. #10
    Apprentice (new member)
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    Onya Doorstop.

    You bloddy tell em mate.

    Wes only wana using correcting teminologicaly and propper anglish on this site. OK

    (stirring, stirring, stirring)

    ------------------
    Some days I turns thisaway, somedays I turns thataway and other days I don't turn at all.

  11. #11
    Apprentice (new member)
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    Post

    Doorstop, thank's for the lesson in terminology. The "cornices" came off a lot easier that I expected. Took off all the old lamipanel sheeting, the old tub and sink. I'm not too bad at pulling things apart, now the test is on putting it back together.

    Thanks Peter

  12. #12
    Apprentice (new member)
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    Well, I've finnished my part of the rbathroom renovation. The old story of the plumber not turning up (also the electrician) when supposed to.

    Glad it's finnished, bloody hot here in Darwin at the moment.

    Thanks everyone - Peter

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