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cutting MDF

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  1. #1
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    Default cutting MDF

    Can MDF be cut with a circular saw? Will it stay together once it has been cut?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Big Shed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alisonol View Post
    Can MDF be cut with a circular saw?
    Yes

    Code:
    Will it stay together once it has been cut?
    No, because it has been cut.

    I think maybe a bit more information is required here

  3. #3
    timber ninja Brown Dog's Avatar
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    Default

    No, because it has been cut.


    Dont know if you meant that to be be funny BS....but i thought it was


    I assumed that alisonol was asking if the cut edge may start to delaminate or something.....I maybe wrong...But if im right the answer is Yes it will stay together .

    cheers
    BD
    [CENTER][I][FONT=Trebuchet MS][SIZE=3][COLOR=#8b0000]

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Shed View Post
    Yes

    Code:
    Will it stay together once it has been cut?
    No, because it has been cut.

    I think maybe a bit more information is required here
    I need a piece of something to cover where the fuel tank sits in my car. The tank sits about 50mm lower than my boot floor. I need to cover an area of 920 x 840. Does this help?

    At my local hardware they have 6mm MDF or 4.8MM masonite. I was thinking of using the MDF as it is 6mm. But I am really open for suggestions?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Big Shed's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alisonol View Post
    I need a piece of something to cover where the fuel tank sits in my car. The tank sits about 50mm lower than my boot floor. I need to cover an area of 920 x 840. Does this help?

    At my local hardware they have 6mm MDF or 4.8MM masonite. I was thinking of using the MDF as it is 6mm. But I am really open for suggestions?
    Either would do, but ideally I would suggest 6mm tempered masonite.

  6. #6
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    Default Be careful of the dust

    One thing that needs to be stated here is that you need to be careful of MDF dust, especially if you are using a power tools. Best to wear a mask. A hand saw won't throw up the dust anywhere near as much dust.

    Gordon

  7. #7
    China
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    Default

    As Big Shed said go for the masonite you will be better off in the long run, it is more durable

  8. #8
    Senior Member munruben's Avatar
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    Masonite would be the better choice much more durable than MDF for your purpose.
    Cheers, John
    Just a thought: If you borrow money from a pessimist, do they expect to get it back?
    I intend to live forever. So far, so good.

    .

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by alisonol View Post
    I need a piece of something to cover where the fuel tank sits in my car. The tank sits about 50mm lower than my boot floor. I need to cover an area of 920 x 840. Does this help?

    At my local hardware they have 6mm MDF or 4.8MM masonite. I was thinking of using the MDF as it is 6mm. But I am really open for suggestions?
    Hi Alisonol,

    Would I be correct in assuming that this "area" is the width and length of the boot or is it a station wagon? If so, what are the dimensions of the 50mm rebate please?

    It would also help if you had a picture of the area you are referring to?

    Cheers
    MH

  10. #10
    Senior Member Ashwood's Avatar
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    Default

    Just to add, for thin mdf, you can also use a thick sharp blade (eg. thicker stanley/tajima "papercutter" type blades) to cut, by scoring it repeatedly until it cuts through.

    Another point to note, Mdf is not very tolerant of water ie. it absorbs water and once it gets wet, it will swell and go out of shape at the affected locations.

    Not that your car boot leaks, but to be safe, I'd go for masonite.

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