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Timber Clothesline

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  1. #1
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    Default Timber Clothesline

    My husband built a great timber clothesline for me. He secured it to the concrete using metal stirrups. Unfortunately once the line was full of washing the stirrups were not strong enough to hold the line without bending. He mentioned bracing it. What would be the easiest way to fix the problem as I am really happy with the line itself.

  2. #2
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    Diagonal braces to each side and perhaps the rear also, Treated pine at an angleof between 45 and 60 degrees?? secured to the ground by small right angle brackets?

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    Move the line out from the terrace, dig large holes and bury the post bottoms with concrete all round. works a treat here in a very high wind area.

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    BCs suggestion is the best solution if the poles are long enough, sounds like yours are already the correct height and therefore poles are too short to bury

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    Where are they flexing/bending? Is it a post or flat metal anchor?

    I'll assume you would be using a pryda as they are the most common.

    If I was going to concrete in and keep posts I would use a pryda high wind anchor as they have 175mm 'seating' compared to 112mm max of others that might help stop/cut down on the flexing.

    I think they would handle side forces a little better than the post variety (and I could imagine the posts flexing) and you mightn't need to then brace them.

    There is a bolt down version but I don't think it offers much more seating depth than the post anchors, although you could possibly try bolting in the 300mm concrete anchor.

    Of course if you are using one of these and this is happening then all of this is moot and I would ditch the posts and go with BC's suggestion.

    Cheers,
    G

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JenC View Post
    My husband built a great timber clothesline for me. He secured it to the concrete using metal stirrups. Unfortunately once the line was full of washing the stirrups were not strong enough to hold the line without bending.
    Did your husband leave a gap between the end of the posts and the cross member in the stirrups and use 12mm bolts? Oops! sorry! wrong thread.

    More seriously, stirrups won't provide adequate lateral support. Solid posts in concrete would be the way to go.

    There is no middle ground between facts and fallacies - argumentum ad temperantiam

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisp View Post
    Did your husband leave a gap between the end of the posts and the cross member in the stirrups and use 12mm bolts? Oops! sorry! wrong thread.
    That thread was dead and buried resurrected and buried again. Be careful. It may come back.

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    Maybe try using a ground screw?

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    You could make a feature out of the bracing of the posts with decking as a screen.

  10. #10
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    Yep thats it the posts are the right height so can't concrete them in
    and have no choice but to attach them to concrete base
    They seem to be bending at the metal stirrup

  11. #11
    Soldiers Earned Your Right To Free Speech watson's Avatar
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    If seen some old lines braced like this.

    untitled.jpeg

  12. #12
    2K Club Member chrisp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JenC View Post
    Yep thats it the posts are the right height so can't concrete them in
    and have no choice but to attach them to concrete base
    They seem to be bending at the metal stirrup
    You could concrete in short posts - say, 600mm high, and bolt the existing posts to the short posts.
    There is no middle ground between facts and fallacies - argumentum ad temperantiam

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    Pix!! Pictures;-) we need pictures

  14. #14
    The Master's Apprentice Bedford's Avatar
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    I would replace the wooden posts with steel ones (preferably galvanized) similar to the pic.

    A 90 or 100mm post with a plate welded on the bottom then Dynabolted or chemset into the concrete would hold any washing you're likely to hang on it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails steel-post.jpeg  
    Posted by John2b, And no, BEVs are not going to save the planet, which doesn't need saving anyway.

  15. #15
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    True Bedford but I think she wants to keep what she has, just stabilized

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    Well if you could get Bedford's infernal contraption to scaled picture height, the posts should hopefully pop in nicely.





    OK, admittedly some routing, paring, cutting thumb, swearing etc.

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    Measure the wooden post? probably 90mm*90mm so 100*100*4 SHS would do the job, but three timber braces at 90/180 and 270 would be cheaper as you could use any F7 treated pine.
    Back and side braces could even be gal wire tied down to an eyebolt by a turnbuckle

  18. #18
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    dsc03574.jpgdsc03576.jpg dsc03573.jpg ok guys here are the pics sorry the important one is side ways it would not let me rotate it
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dsc03574.jpg   dsc03573.jpg  

  19. #19
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    Ahhhhh.....bin the stirrups. They are nowhere near sufficient as you've realised.

    Use the high wind load brackets or heavy duty builders brackets instead. On the inside and outside of each post you'll need a diagonally reinforced bracket to reinforce the post as well against the wieght of the washing. Alternatively, a diagonal (60 degree) wire stay from near the top of the posts down to the ground at either end would be ideal too.

    The absolute best solution would be to drill a hole through the concrete down at least 800mm and insert a 100mm square gal steel post (or even two) leaving about 400mm above ground and bolt your timber up to that a'la Watsons diagram further up...but you'll still probably need the wire stay.
    Joined RF in 2006...Resigned in 2020.

  20. #20
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    Thanks Silentbutdeadly I will pass this info onto my Hubby

  21. #21
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    Didn't I post that as well?

    Stirrup posts are good for uplift, but as you have seen, no strength laterally. You could also use 2 wires from the top or about 1/3rd down like a tent guy-rope with an angle between them of between 90 & 60 degrees, that will give good lateral stability as well.

    Timber is easier to see than a wire so the wire option while cheaper and easier may be a tripping hazard
    Last edited by Moondog55; 22nd Jul 2011 at 10:44 AM. Reason: Extra information and last minute thought

  22. #22
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    Hi everyone thanks for all the input my husband has gone with some metal contraption like Bedfords. He will be installing them this weekend so heres hoping! I may finally get the washing dry.

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